Sufism May Save the World

Did you know that “Sufism provides answers to some of the most complex issues in the contemporary Muslim world, where youth comprise the majority of the population”?  This is great news.  Listen to this:

Moroccan youth are increasingly drawn to Sufism because of its tolerance, its fluid interpretation of the Qur’an, its rejection of fanaticism and its embrace of modernity. Young men and women find in the Sufi principles of “beauty” and “humanity” a balanced lifestyle that allows them to enjoy arts, music and love without having to abandon their spiritual and religious obligations.

As an American theologian explains,

Sufism or tasawwuf, as it is called in Arabic, is generally understood by scholars and Sufis to be the inner, mystical, or psycho-spiritual dimension of Islam. Today, however, many Muslims and non-Muslims believe that Sufism is outside the sphere of Islam. Nevertheless, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, one of the foremost scholars of Islam, in his article The Interior Life in Islam contends that Sufism is simply the name for the inner or esoteric dimension of Islam.

After nearly 30 years of the study of Sufism, I would say that in spite of its many variations and voluminous expressions, the essence of Sufi practice is quite simple. It is that the Sufi surrenders to God, in love, over and over; which involves embracing with love at each moment the content of one’s consciousness (one’s perceptions, thoughts, and feelings, as well as one’s sense of self) as gifts of God or, more precisely, as manifestations of God.

But Idries Shah still best defines Sufism:

In Sufism, the shortcomings of the dictionary are exposed perhaps more strikingly than in other fields…A Persian dictionary…says: ‘What is a Sufi? A Sufi is a Sufi”–and succeeds in rhyming the entry: Sufi chist?–Sufi Sufi’st.  This is actually a Sufi quotation.  The compiler does not believe in trying to define the undefinable.  An Urdu one says: ‘Sufi refers to any one of numerous special, but successively necessary, stages of being, open to humanity under certain circumstances, understood correctly only by those who are in this state of ‘work’ (amal); considered mysterious, inaccessible or invisible to those who have not the means of perceiving it.

I find this very hopeful.